Wednesday, September 2, 2009

Teacher Survey

Because of all this ruckus with the reasons why I wasn't rehired and now having to hunt for a new job I thought I would survey my pool of local Elementary school teachers to get their feedback on teaching.

So using the email list that the city government gave to us around March I sent out a survey to see if I could get the opinion and details of other Elementary school teachers.

The responses have been thin so far but still worth noting.

Here for you will be the questions I asked on the survey and an anonymous listing of the responses I received.

Questions:
  1. How many regular classes do you teach? (These are the ones that go by the standard curriculum, usually taught in the morning)
  2. How many after school or special classes do you teach?
  3. How much time are you given to plan everything? Do you feel it is enough time?
  4. How did you first communicate with your coteacher? Were they open or close minded about your ideas?
  5. What percentage do you feel you teach in the classroom when you are coteaching with your coteacher? (I was suppose to do 80% as my coteacher finally told me)
  6. What is your style of teaching?
  7. How did you figure out your style of teaching?
  8. Class management: Who does it you or the coteacher or both? How successful has it been?
  9. Do you receive helpful criticism or critiquing for your teaching style?
  10. Any advice or story you can tell that you think would be important to future teachers.
Response #1:
1. 22
2.2
3. i believe so, but i just got them off my butt so i can do things myself.
4.i let them play boss and when one wanted me to do more the other was a controll freak, i then declared that this semester was mine, and i was doing the lesson plans and if there were things they wanted to put in there , that was fine, but they had to give me a little notice. Over all my main co teacher is still boss.
5. 50-50 - 80-20
6. old school, I think power point is a flashy ploy that wastes time and the kids stare at screens enough in their life. I follow a modified city syllibus, some songs, old school or self invented games. board work consisting of repitision and some note taking.
7. i did a little in the US. If they work with me, i do more things they like if they work against me i get more authoritan. I dont bribe or deal and nor do I pretend I am Barney.
I just always try to take it from their point of view and see what i can do with in reason. It is school not romper room.
8.Both, both my teachers are pretty fluent. One is in grad school the other has been teaching for a while.
9.yes, i talk too fast, some time too big words, useing more present tense in my questions. There have been some pointless and incorrect ball breaking as well. But we are helpful to eachother.
10. At first, they are always right, just go with the flow, but once they start contradictiing themselves you take a stance at one point or another. There are small things that you think you may but you dont. I have heard people who have done esl for three or four years and do things...differently. I only subed for two or so years, but different schools, subjects, age levels, economic area, and had picked a lot of brains and observed alot. Because of that i know some things even my co teachers should but dont. At the same time I know I am not a edu major, and even though I have experienced myself the sublties of the classroom. I will still take the position of someone who has never taught before that has a non education degree. I keep a open mind when any teachers talk about their experiences. Knowing that you do not know is a great thing to......know.
Response #2:
I think you would be more successful if you asked people that you know these questions in person.
Response #3:
I teach 21 regular classes a week. I teach four special classes a week. I basically plan evrything out whilst not in class. I generally have plenty of time. My co-teacher is very receptive to any new ideas but can change the direction that any class is going in on a whim. Sometimes frustrating but not all that bad.

In reality, the teaching should be 50/50 but my co-teacher isn't even in the classroom for a good majority of the time (she's insanely busy with daft paperwork), so there is no easy answer there. I always start each class with an English song, use a little bit of the book, use plenty of group activities and play lots of games. I figured out my style of teaching through trial and error.

Class management has not been easy. My co-teacher has gotten a bit too strict for my liking but then again, she isn't in the classroom most of the time. So, I basically banish an unruly student to a corner, with her/his arms up, if she/he is continually messing. It's had mixed results.

My co-teacher gives mostly positive feedback and rarely criticizes me. That's nice. The main thing that future teachers have to remember is that you have to be extremely patient and understand that you co-teaching with somebody with a totally different mindset.


As you can see it is truly random as to what ends up happening at each school. I sent this out to about 20 teachers and so far just 3 responses have come in. I am hopeful more will respond but I can understand if some people don't want to spend their time on this.

As for you dear readers if you are a public Elementary school teacher in Korea I would love to hear your responses.
Edit: If you are a public school teacher in GENERAL and in Korea then please volunteer your knowledge!

Job Hunt Update: Nothing to talk about just yet. I have a phone call with a recruiter this afternoon, which I am kind of nervous about because it was asked for all of a sudden. Basically I asked the recruiter some questions (in regards to the recent SMOE firings) and their response was "Let's talk on the phone." So I hope I won't be chewed out or something. All in all I think it is still too early because I am getting the impression schools don't scout for a new teacher until the month before. We will see!~

3 comments:

  1. Elementary teacher through GEPIK.

    1. How many regular classes do you teach? (These are the ones that go by the standard curriculum, usually taught in the morning).

    I have 9 DIFFERENT classes, but the 5th and 6th graders meet twice a week, so total hours per week of regular classes is 14. And then on top I have 8 hours worth of special classes.


    2. How many after school or special classes do you teach?

    8 hours worth, like said above. But they don't count as extra pay since they're within 22 hours.

    3. How much time are you given to plan everything? Do you feel it is enough time?

    It depends. Sometimes they let me know last minute if I have an extra class, or I have to teach this class instead of another one, etc, but in general I have time.

    4. How did you first communicate with your coteacher? Were they open or close minded about your ideas?

    Mostly open but usually I let them do what they want, and sometimes I input some ideas if I feel like it's good.

    5. What percentage do you feel you teach in the classroom when you are coteaching with your coteacher? (I was suppose to do 80% as my coteacher finally told me)

    Regular classes, usually about 60-40. Special classes, 100% me.


    6. What is your style of teaching?

    Regular classes, do the book and videos and activites. Special - lots of powerpoint games, and whiteboard games, and worksheets.

    7. How did you figure out your style of teaching?

    Experimenting.

    8. Class management: Who does it you or the coteacher or both? How successful has it been?

    Coteacher does it. The kids don't usually listen to me and just do whatever they want so coteacher has to yell and punish them. Sometimes it works but some grades, like 6, the kids are always loud and rowdy no matter how much she yells at them.

    9. Do you receive helpful criticism or critiquing for your teaching style?

    Not really. Just from the kids if they say they're bored or they don't want this game or something.

    10. Any advice or story you can tell that you think would be important to future teachers.

    The most important thing is to be patient. Things happen last minute here, and you just can't always prepare for it. I never taught or anything before coming here so this is a new experience for me, and it's not all good or bad, it's just a learning experience.


    I'm sure I was too rambly and not sure if I made sense.

    ReplyDelete
  2. 1. How many regular classes do you teach? (These are the ones that go by the standard curriculum, usually taught in the morning)

    Roughly 15, but sometimes up to 18. Our contracts in Jeollanamdo are only up to 20 classes.

    2. How many after school or special classes do you teach? About 4, sometimes a few more a month. They are all extra classes with extra pay even though some are within my 20 hours.

    3. How much time are you given to plan everything? Do you feel it is enough time?

    Gobs of time. I'm so bored at work half the time that I don't know what to do with myself. I have stockpiles of lesson plans for so many topics.


    4. How did you first communicate with your coteacher? Were they open or close minded about your ideas?

    I have a supervisor, but my school is weird in that I dont actually have a co-teacher. I don't mind it.


    5. What percentage do you feel you teach in the classroom when you are coteaching with your coteacher? (I was suppose to do 80% as my coteacher finally told me)

    100%, see above.

    6. What is your style of teaching?

    A little bit of everything. Follow the book and use it as a guideline, powerpoints to show pictures for new vocabulary (extra words that I chose related to the section), handouts, writing on the board, songs, youtube or other videos, etc.

    7. How did you figure out your style of teaching?

    Years of tutoring, some for a job and some for the dozens and dozens of cousins I have. I also experimented my first few months and learned a lot from the other Korean teachers at the school. I sat in on a few of their classes. Every once in a while the foreigners in my city will get together to share ideas and their ideas have been helpful as well.

    8. Class management: Who does it you or the coteacher or both? How successful has it been?

    I do. Only once have I had to go grab a teacher to help out. My school is weird though, because there are two foreign teachers there and no co-teacher.

    9. Do you receive helpful criticism or critiquing for your teaching style?

    Only after I asked recently. It was extremely helpful in many ways. There were also some things the school wasn't happy about but no one let on until I asked, which annoyed me because if I'd changed that particular thing, the students would have learned better and the school would have been happier.

    10. Any advice or story you can tell that you think would be important to future teachers.

    It's perfectly fine to take a job for the money and other benefits associated with it, but, like any job one has, try your best with it. There's nothing more irritating than someone that takes a job teaching in Korea (or any job for that matter) and treats it like a joke. I'm not saying that foreign teachers are top notch professionals or even considered serious teachers by the Koreans, but it's still important to do as good a job as you can. The students and co-workers view you as an ambassador of your country and culture, so presenting the best view possible is a wise decision. You have plenty of hours outside of work to act a fool around your friends. Keep it professional in the workplace.

    Also, it's going to be frustrating. Such is the nature of working in a foreign country. Take it all in stride and realize that there are sooooo many things you can't control and worrying about it will only lead you to become irritated and even angry. You'll have surprise meetings and classes, you're going to be confused about everything, you are likely to never really know what's going on. Might as well make a conscious decision to simply brush it off and get over it early in the game.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks everyone for your input it is really great material.

    ReplyDelete

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